U.S. teachers 6th highest paid in the world

Teacher Salary ComparisonI tend to think of US teachers being relatively poorly compensated in our society, especially when compared to say, private equity fund managers. And I always thought that many developed nations paid their teachers far more than we do in the United States. So I was surprised to see that U.S. public school teachers are the sixth highest paid teachers in the world, according this January 29, 2014 UNESCO analysis (p. 254) that adjusts wages by domestic purchasing power so you can compare different currencies and countries more fairly. (Click on the chart to see a larger version where you can read the country names and $$ more easily).

The other interesting thing is that Asian countries, whose students top the international charts on PISA tests, don’t rank highly on this teacher salary chart. The highest paid teachers in Asia are in South Korea, the 21st county on the list.

Follow up post:

US rookie teachers relatively better paid than veteran teachers

 


POSTED BY Jill Barshay ON March 7, 2014

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[…] usually reliable and cool Hechinger Report blew one last week, reporting “…  I always thought that many developed nations paid their teachers far […]

[…] U.S. teachers 6th highest paid in the world Hechinger Report: U.S. public school teachers are the sixth highest paid teachers in the world, according this UNESCO analysis that adjusts wages by domestic purchasing power so you can compare different currencies and countries more fairly. […]

[…] U.S. teachers 6th highest paid in the world Hechinger Report: U.S. public school teachers are the sixth highest paid teachers in the world, according this UNESCO analysis that adjusts wages by domestic purchasing power so you can compare different currencies and countries more fairly. […]

[…] purchasing power so you can compare different currencies and countries more fairly.” (U.S. teachers 6th highest paid in the world Hechinger […]

tom winchester

Who cares what rank teacher pay is for the U.S. They still don’t make much and many of their benefits are starting to disappear. I worked 10 years before I could make it through the summer without borrowing money. Half of the teachers now don’t make it to the second year? Why? Pay is poor and teachers don’t get any support. States have taken over the classrooms. They tell teachers what to teach, when to teach it and how to teach it. We need teaching robots that will be very cheap to have in the classrooms. lol

Doug

Incomplete data for drawing conclusions. Teacher salary after 15 years of experience places the US in the middle of the pack when compared to industrialized countries. Compare GDP to salary, US is at the bottom. US teachers also teach up to 30% more than the average country. One Single data set is incomplete for drawing conclusions. Can we really compare teachers in Africa to an industrialized country? http://economix.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/09/09/teacher-pay-around-the-world/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0

Barb

This is so no true. Teachers not only are underpaid they hardly talk here about benefits teachers have in the rest of the world. Maybe some counties do not have great salaries but have lots of benefits like free health insurance for wives and kids, tourism, free training courses, none of these even exists in the us. They only get insurace for themselves ,wives and kids not covered,long working no pay, told all the time what to teach , , like robots, and their time is mostly spent in doing paperwork so children are taught by aids .

James Chapman

I would LOVE to know how many instructional hours and how many planning hours teachers in each of these countries are paid for. Everything I have read indicates teachers in the United States spend a much higher percentage of their working hours in the classroom compared with teachers in other countries. Other countries allow much more time for planning than does the United States.

Let’s also look at how many hours a typical teacher really works, not just the contract mandated paid time, but also the time they spend planning, grading, accessing, ect, when they are “not on the clock.” I think those results would really shock some people.

Jill Barshay

@James Chapman The OECD’s TALIS survey compares how teachers spend their hours across countries. You can see that U.S. teachers spend more time teaching in the classroom so they have to work longer hours to get their planning, collaboration and professional development in. Here is a link to the U.S. report. See page 12. http://www.oecd.org/unitedstates/TALIS-2013-country-note-US.pdf

Gabriel Ross

This ranking needs to be understood in the context of the report. The ranking was made in such a way as to evaluate spending and investment in mostly very poor nations. The method will inevitably put the USA towards the very top given that the power of the US dollar is much greater than any other currency in use in sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, or South-East Asia.

Abbass

How are the class time all over the world ?

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